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Schedule 6 Local Heritage Places

The Murweh Shire Council has adopted a Local Heritage Register in accordance with the requirements of Part 11 of the Queensland Heritage Act 1992 (the Act). The Act requires local councils keep a Local Heritage Register of places of cultural significance in its area and will identify and protect the history and heritage of the Murweh Shire for future generations.

The local heritage places not only provide a sense of identity for the local community but reflect the unique history of our Shire. The places listed below have been included on the register as they reflect the important historical themes of the Murweh Shire such as a significant regional centre, agricultural activities and tourism.

The significance of identified places was assessed using recognised heritage criteria including:

  1. The place is important in demonstrating the evolution or pattern of the Shires history.
  2. The place demonstrates rare, uncommon or endangered aspects of the Shire's cultural heritage.
  3. The place has potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of the Shire's history.
  4. The place is important in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a particular class of cultural places important to the Shire.
  5. The place is important to the Shire because of its aesthetic significance.
  6. The place is important in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period for the Shire.
  7. The place has a strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons important to the Shire.
  8. The place has a special association with the life or work of a particular person, group or organisation of importance in the Shire's history.

Table SC6.1 - Local Heritage Places

Place Name Address Town Real Property Description Statement of heritage significance History/description State Heritage Listed (Y/N) - EHP ID
Augathella
Anglican Church 61 Main Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: The first St. Luke's Church was built in the early 1900's. During the time of the early church many people worshipped there and the sacraments were administered by the Bush Brothers. The first St. Luke's was eventually replaced with the present day church in 1957 at a cost of £8300 " N
Arts and Craft Centre (former Helton's Building) Main Street Augathella   (a), (d), (e) "Erected 1934-35 (following destruction of earler block of shops by fire) by a local businessman,Edwin Helton, and known as Helton’s Building, this row of shops originally contained a range of small businesses including a bakery, billiards room, general store and newsagency. Helton’s bakery was well known throughout the area, delivering bread as far 34 away as Tambo. After the business finally closed in the 1960s, the building remained vacant for some time before being used as a local meeting hall and craft centre. Since 1993 it has operated as a craft shop run by the Augathella Cultural Association. The early facade, made of pressed metal resembling brick, remains a feature of the building." N
Augathella Race Course off West Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: Horse racing was a popular pastime in the early days. Country Races were often held on stations with station horses doubling as race horses as early the late 1800’s. The first official race meeting was held at the Augathella Racecourse on the 17th May 1947 to raise money to build the Memorial Hall (Shire Hall). Horse owners were invited to a paddock to race their horses. First prize was £3 and second prize was £1 for each race " N
Augathella Water Tower Forest Street Augathella   (a), (d), (e) (landmark) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: The Great Artesian Basin is one of the largest underground water basins in the world and covers one fifth of Australia. Water from the Basin is pumped to the houses in Augathella, the water tower maintains equal pressure for the reticulation system." N
Butcher Shop Main Street Augathella   (a), (d) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: The first Augathella Butcher was Richard Frazer, originally worked as a railway worker in Quilpie he set up a Butchers Shop in Charleville before opening the Augathella Shop in 1918. The butchery is still operated by Colin, Richard’s great grandson. The meat ant sign on the wall is a fun depiction of the Mighty Meat Ants." N
Catholic Church Annie Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: In 1864 when the first catholic family, Sam and Mary Brassington, settled on this part of the Warrego River, many other Catholic pioneering families followed them. Augathella became a part of the Charleville Parish in 1879. In 1893 Catherine Burns purchased a block of land on which was an old cemetery. A small wooden church, called St Patrick's, was built about 1895. This church served the community until the 9th of May 1954 when the present church buildings were opened. Augathella became a parish in 1944, the first resident priest was Fr Simon O'Dea. The last St Patrick's residentpriest left in 1988. In 2002 a Sister of St Joseph came to the community as the resident Parish Pastoral Associate." N
Catholic School Annie Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: In 1928 Archbishop Duhig opened a hostel boarding school in Augathella. The convent school became a focal point for town and district as it drew children of all denominations, from properties and the town. Eventually the boarding section closed and a new school was built in the 1970's and a house was provided for the Sisters to live in. The Sisters remained until 1979. The school stayed open until 1981 with a lay principal. The `old convent' was sold but it remained a symbol of connection within the community, to other religious denominations and in particular, to the past. When it was burnt down it was the cause of grief for the whole Augathella community." N
Cemetery off Russell Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: The Cemetery at Augathella is a poignant place, it records a sad history of infant mortality and death through injuries sustained in tough outback life. There is one Chinese grave remaining in the cemetery." N
Ellangowan Hotel Main & Annie Streets Augathella   (a), (d), (e) "The former name of Augathella is perpetuated in this hotel, now the only survivor of a number of hotels that once lined Main Street. There has been a public house on this site since 1869, and for the first 86 years the licence was controlled by the Cavanagh family. Catherine Cavanagh bought the block during the first land sale in 1880, and the name ‘Ellangowan Hotel’ appears on early records dating from soon after that date. Not a lot is known of the history of the present hotel, which was probably built between the early 1900s and the 1920s to replace an earlier establishment of the same name. From Murweh Heritage Trail: Built by the Cavanagh Family in the mid 1800’s. Named after the original name of Augathella, the Ellengowan is the only hotel now left on town. Augathella once boasted two other hotels; The Royal (Creevy Family) and The Claren (Pat Earner) both were destroyed by fire." N
Hospital Cavanagh Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: The first Augathella Hospital housed separate men and woman’s ward; outpatient’s dispensary; kitchen nurse’s dining room and verandah. Tents were used to accommodate some patients. All sterilising was done in the kitchen on the stove and taken to the hospital in kettles. There was no doctor’s surgery; mothers had their babies at home assisted by two midwives from the hospital." N
Kennif Tree cnr Jane and Cavanagh Streets Augathella   (a), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: This magnificent old Coolibah tree is where the Kenniff Bushrangers tethered their horses when in Augathella. The brothers lived on the property “Ralph” north of Augathella and were frequent visitors to the town. They were the last bushrangers to be hung in Queensland." N
Old Water Tower Nelson Street Augathella   (a), (e) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: Artesian Bores were sunk in Augathella to provide much needed water in the harsh dry climate. Look closely at the framework of the tower built using hot rivets. " N
Police Station Main Street Augethella   (a), (d), (e) "By 1905 the original forty-year-old, shingle- roofed police station at Augathella had outlived its usefulness and a new building was requested. Plans were prepared by Thomas Pye, an architect of the Public Works Department. Later, as the Government Architect, Pye was to be responsible for the design of the Lands Administration Building in Brisbane (now the Hotel Conrad) and the Rockhampton Customs House. A local contractor named Somerville built the new station office in 1906 and quarters for the constables were completed in 1907. From Murweh Heritage Trail: Both buildings are constructed of weatherboard with an iron roof. The station originally comprised three small rooms for the use of the Acting Sergeant and his family. A small room on the verandah was for the use of the unmarried Constable. The Watch House contained two small cells used as a temporary jail facility for holding people awaiting legal judgment." N

Post Office

Main Street Augathella   (a), (d) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: The original Post Office officially opened in 1883 and was the hub of communication and handled all the mail off the Cobb & Co. Coaches. Dick Bottcher was Postmaster. The current Post Office was built in 1961, and included the Exchange with a residence behind. In 1985 the Post Office became a privately owned business and now operates as a Postal Agency, boutique Coffee & Gift Shop." N
Rodeo Grounds Elmes Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: The first Augathella Rodeo was held just prior to World War II in 1938, to benefit the Augathella Convent. During the War another Rodeo was held for the Red Cross. In 1947, Oliver Smith, who lost a son in the war, began holding The Augathella Diggers Rodeo and Campdraft, It has operated every year since then with the exception of two years – once cancelled due to drought and the other due to flood…. “a land of drought and flooding rains” in every sense!" N
Town Hall Main Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: The Town Hall was built in 1946 at a cost of £1500 for material and £1200 for labour. The Hall, like many in the outback, is used for travelling shows, weddings, meetings and dances." N
War Memorial Hall Main Street Augathella   (a), (d), (g) "From Murweh Heritage Trail: Augathella’s War Memorial hall houses the “Rolls of honour” listing names of those who served in World War I & II, Korean and Vietnam Wars. The memorial also serves as the meeting place ANZAC day. In 1946 the people of Augathella and district in order to show their sincere gratitude to the members of the fighting forces for their self-sacrifing efforts proposed to build a memorial hall at a cost of approximately £4500. The Memorial Hall was officially opened on the 17th May 1947 by Councillor C.A.Little with a grand ball preceded by a race meeting in the afternoon. War memorial tablets at the front of the building and clock with plaque The Charleville Times , 9th, 23rd & 30th May" N
Ralph's Bore & Upper Warrego Police Barracks site Dooloogarah Carnarvon National Park Road Augathella   (a) "The upper Warrego Police Barracks were established at this site during the late 1890s, reputedly to deal with the 'illegal' activity (principally cattle duffing) of the Kenniff family. With the murder of Constable George Doyle (stationed at the barracks) and Christian Dahlke, the manager of 'Carnarvon' station and the subsequent arrest and conviction of Patrick and James Kenniff, the police presence was withdrawn and the barracks sold to 'Carnarvon' station. Description: Ralph's bore and the site of the Upper Warrego Police barracks are located 20km south-west of 'Carnarvon' station homestead on the Augathella-Carnarvon road. The bore is situated 60m east of the road on a fence line behind a set of stockyards. The site of the Upper Warrego Police barracks is located 50m to the north of the cattle grid a few metres off the eastern side of the road at the begginning of the bend in the road toward the north-west. The bore and pump have been here since the late nineteenth century which made it possible for this remote police station to be established. The barracks were located at this site for several years until 1903 when it was sold to the owners of 'Carnarvon' station where it was relocated to and used a shearers/stockmens' quarters. The barracks, which survive today, are to be relocated to a museum in the town of Mitchell some time during 1999." N - 635227
Fig Tree Spring Stockyards Carnarvon Station Augathella   (a) "Further Assessment Required" N - 635095
Dingo Fence Section Mt Tabor Augathella   (a), (b) "Further Assessment Required. Reported in 1975: Portion of the old Dingo barrier fence which ran thousands of miles across Australia." N - 638402
CWA - Country Womens Association Cavanagh Street Augathella   (a), (g) "Further Assessment Required. From Murweh Heritage Trail: The Queensland Country Women's Association, was established in 1922 and is one of the largest voluntary womens organisations in Queensland. Without CWA many women would have found the isolation of remote stations and towns almost unbearable. Meeting gave a much needed respite from the loneliness or often just a shoulder to cry on. CWA raise funds to assist families of the bush in times of hardship and have residences that are used by country people to support families in hospital, provide accommodation for students or just to have a holiday. Scholarships are offered to rural students wanting to further their education including high school, University and also offer a post graduate scholarship for a rural nurse." N
Charleville
Australian Workers’ Union Office Galatea Street Charleville   (a), (d), (e), (g) "This Art Deco office was constructed as purpose- built premises for the Charleville branch of the Australian Workers’ Union (AWU) in 1939. At the time of construction the office consisted of a large meeting room, secretary’s office and clerks’ rooms. It replaced an earlier timber office built in the 1910s. Designed by architects Kemp and Hannon, the new office was a good example of a contemporary public building of the time and reflects the prominence of the AWU in outback communities. The AWU was founded in 1886, representing mainly shearers, miners and bushworkers at a time when labour politics was on the rise and unionism was gaining strength across the nation. The AWU became established in Queensland in 1913 and is one of Queensland's largest and individual unions." N
Bank of New South Wales Wills Street Charleville   (a), (d), (e) "A branch of the Bank of New South Wales opened in Charleville in 1929. In 1937, as confidence returned after the Depression years, the bank moved from its early chambers into this modern, two-storey building in Wills Street, where it continued operating for many years, more recently as the Westpac Bank. The building is no longer used as a bank . Architect firm Hall and Cook called tenders (to be built in reinforced concrete) between March and April 1936." N
Charleville Fire Station 103 Galatea Street Charleville   (a), (d), (g) "The present two storey brick headquarters was constructed in 1938 to replace the early fire brigade station. Reported to be built at cost of £3000. Architects Hall & Phillips. In 1897 the residents of Charleville formed a volunteer fire brigade after a series of disastrous fires that caused extensive damage to the early township. The brigade soon acquired a hand-operated pump, which became known as 'The Contraption'. The first fire engine was purchased in 1922." N
Cominos Building Cnr Wills and Edward (Watson?) streets Charleville   (a), (g) "This building was constructed for Cominos and Co. in 1937, with a shop and cafe on the ground floor and a residence for the shopkeepers on the upper level. The Cominos family were a Greek family who settled in Charleville around this time. The shop was known locally as the ‘Black & White Shop’ for many years because of the black and white tiles that decorated the shop front. The shop eventually became a hardware store, then was used as a cafe again until Bidjara Housing and Land Co. took over the premises." N
Commonwealth Bank Alfred Street Charleville   (a), (d), (e) "The Commonwealth Bank opened its first Charleville branch in 1921 as a result of the amalgamation of the bank with the Queensland Government Savings Bank. Until then the Commonwealth Bank had operated through a savings bank agency at the Post Office. The first branch was established in premises adjoining the Dalton Hotel in Alfred Street, but expansion was rapid and larger premises were soon required. In 1928-29 a modern, two-storey concrete bank building was erected opposite the old site. Tenders were called by the Commonwealth Works Director in August 1928. The building continues to serve as the Charleville office of the Commonwealth Bank." N
Glenroy Woolscour Ruins Warrego Highway Cherleville   (a), (c) "A bore and meatworks were established at Glenroy siding, on the Western Railway just east of Charleville, in the late 1880s. About 1897 the Charleville Refrigeration and Boiling Down Works were erected here, at the height of the great 1890s drought, for the purpose of rendering starving sheep into tallow wax. The boiling-down works was later converted to a woolscour to treat wool produced in the district following a return to better seasons in the early 1900s. Glenroy woolscour continued to operate until 1940. During World War II the woolscour was used as a storage facility for the new US air base at Charleville airfield. A large fibro-sheeted warehouse and three prefabricated workshops were erected at the site and three 25 000 gallon fuel tanks were installed. These structures were removed by the US forces on their departure in 1944." N
Hotel Charleville cnr Wills and Alfred Streets Charleville   (a), (d), (e) "The Hotel Charleville, a two storey brick building opened in April 1932 and was designed by Hall and Cook architects.The first Charleville Hotel was established in the late 1860s and served for a time as the local court house. Following its destruction by fire, a new hotel of the same name was erected in 1884 by Albert Aeschimann, who is said to have arrived in Charleville in 1882 after studying in Paris as a ‘chef de cuisine’. The owner of Charleville’s Paris Cafe, Harry Corones, acquired the hotel in 1912 after a representative of Perkins Brewery, who was impressed by Harry’s conviviality, persuaded him to move into the hotel business. Fire destroyed the buildings the following year and in 1914 Corones erected an impressive two-storey timber hotel, which he sold in 1924 to establish his new Hotel Corones. The Hotel Charleville was again destroyed by fire in 1931 which led to the current hotel being built." N
Murweh Shire Chambers Alfred Street Charleville   (a), (d), (e) "This office, of masonry construction, was completed in 1938 for Murweh Shire Council. Hall and Phillips designed the building and TG Woollon was the contractor. It replaced the original shire chambers, built of timber. Murweh Divisional Board was proclaimed in 1879 following the establishment of the Divisional Boards Act, which provided the first form of local government in regional Queensland. The boards were the precursors to the shire councils of today. The first meeting of the Murweh Divisional Board was held in March 1880, in the Charleville Court House. The site of the present office was chosen in 1881. In 1894 the Town of Charleville was proclaimed as a separate municipality. Divisional boards were abolished throughout Queensland in 1902 when the Murweh Shire Council was proclaimed. However, it was not until 1961 that the Charleville Town Council amalgamated with the Murweh Shire Council and the area was once again governed by a single local authority." N
Ross & Keith Smith’s Landing Ground Adavale Road Charleville   (a) "During the historic first flight from England to Australia,Captain Ross Smith and Lieutenant Keith Smith landed their Vickers Vimy aircraft on this open plain beside the Ward River in December 1919. Here they carried out emergency repairs before continuing to Charleville." N
School of Arts Hotel cnr Wills and Edward (Watson?) streets Charleville   (a), (d), (e) "Completed in 1925, this was the second School of Arts Hotel built in Charleville, and is thought to be the earliest building in Charleville constructed of concrete. It replaced the original timber hotel, which burnt down in the early 1920s." N
Steiger Vortex Gun Sturt Street, Bicentennial Park Charleville   (a), (b), (h) "South-west Queensland was among the regions worst affected by the great drought which took hold throughout inland Australia from the mid-1890s and lasted until the early 1900s. The drought caused many unorthodox methods of rain- making to be trialled. In 1902 a meteorologist, Clement Wragge, proposed producing rain from the cloudless sky by sending massive blasts into the atmosphere, having observed winemakers in Italy using ‘vortex guns’ designed by a German named Stiger. Wragge ordered six Stiger vortex guns to be manufactured and, after discussions with the local Murweh Council, the guns were installed at locations around Charleville where they were filled with gunpowder and detonated simultaneously. The result was a cacophony of sound, with two of the guns exploding; it is reported that the only thing that fell was the hopes of the rain-makers. The surviving guns can be seen on display in Sturt Street, at the entrance to Bicentennial Park." N
Police station and residences Alfred Street Charleville   (a), (d) "Timber Police station built 1938. The two cottages between the court house and the Commonwealth Bank building were built as the residences for the police inspector and the senior sergeant." N
Court House Alfred Street Charleville Lot 2 C1405 (a), (d), (e) "The present court house was completed in 1938, the year in which a new police station was built in Charleville. Designed by Public Works architect Raymond Nowland.The town’s first purpose-built court house was erected in 1900 by the Public Works Department. By 1937, as Charleville continued to develop as the government administration centre for the south-west, departments in town began to outgrow their existing accommodation and extensions were made to the early court house to provide rooms for the Lands Office staff, who were housed in another building. Also of interest are the two cottages between the court house and the Commonwealth Bank building that were built as the residences for the police inspector and the senior sergeant. This area was dominated by government buildings and had been marked out as a government or civic precinct when the town of Charleville was surveyed in 1868. " N - 602018
Charleville Post Office cnr Alfred and Wills streets Charleville   (a), (d), (e), (g) "Charleville Post Office is of the M7 1940s-50s porch, parapet and hip design. It was built in 1941 and follows the T15 (Federation Timber) post office completed in 1904. Sections of the 1904 building were incorporated in the present post office. This style of post office is a single storey brick, some rendered, austere in character and detail. At the rear of the post office building is a c1950s exchange extension." N - 614029
Presbyterian Church and associated buildings 74 Galatea Street Charleville   (a), (d), (g) "Post-war brick church and hall (and rectory). Old church hall reported in 1975 in rear of grounds, may no longer exist." N - 638377
Old Cemetery King Street Charleville   (a), (d), (g) "Important record of history of residents of Charleville." N - 638384
Warrego Club Clubhouse 95 Galatea Street Charleville   (a), (g) "Single storey timber building (date unknown). Has been the social centre of Charleville for many years." N - 638388
Chapel of the Church of England School Hostel 80 Watson Street Charleville   (a), (d) "A small wooden chapel in the (former?) hostel grounds. The original wall replaced on the exterior with fibro." N - 638389
Church of England Rectory and Stables, Church Hall 33 Alfred Street Charleville   (a), (d), (g) "Post-war brick church c1950s. Site used from the earliest days of Charleville by the Bush Brotherhood. 1975: Rectory is a large timber dwelling with well preserved architectural items. Stables reported onsite in 1975. Site on the banks of the Warrego. Church hall on same property." N - 638390
Town Hall Cnr Wills and Edward Streets Charleville   (a), (d), (e), (g) "The town of Charleville was proclaimed a separate municipality in March 1894 and the town hall completed in 1926, expresses the confidence that abounded in the town with its expansion during the boom decade of the 1920s. Murweh Division was declared under the Divisional Boards Act of 1879 and the new divisional area became the forerunner of Murweh Shire, which was created in 1902. Architects Hall and Devereux. Brick, neo classical elements." N - 638391
Race Course and Showgrounds - early buildings and structures Charleville Showgrounds Charleville   (a), (d) "Good example of public race course buildings in an area where horse racing was probably the centre of social gatherings for many years in a community of country people".
"An old well built timber grandstand of good design reported in 1975."
N - 638392
Warrego Chambers (former) 80-82 Alfred St Charleville   (a), (d), (e) "Two story brick building, erected 1927 for Vera and Henry Barnes." N
l'Anson Tait and Barnes Building cnr Galatea and Wills St Charleville   (a), (d), (e) "Built 1937. Commercial building - highly decorative and externally intact. Hall and Cook called tenders for a block of shops for H.E Barnes in May 1937. Originally housed People's Cash Store, chemist and newsagency." N
CWA - Country Womens Association Galatea Street Charleville   (a), (d), (g) "CWA Restrooms were constructed in the 1940s (by 1947). Single storey timber building." N
Queensland Ambulance Service Building cnr Edwards and Sturt Streets Charleville   (a), (d), (g) "Constructed c1955 - two storey brick building. Hall architect." N
NAB Bank Wills Street Charleville   (a), (e) "Modernist 1950s bank originally built for Commercial Bank of Sydney." N
Catholic Church cnr Wills & Watson Streets Charleville   (a), (d), (e), (g) "Modernist brick church opened June 1953." N
Commercial Building 47 Wills Street Charleville   (a), (e) "Constructed c 1937 when owned by Corones Hotel proprietors." N
Road Bridge Wills Street Charleville   (a), (d) "Concrete bridge completed in 1936." N
King Edward Park Watson and Parry St Charleville   (a), (g) "Park and recreation social space in Charleville - established early 20th century." N
Roche's Building   Charleville   (a), (e) "Single story commercial building erected 1923." N
Old Railway Bore site and Water tower Parry Street Tower Charleville   (a), (d), (g) "Bore thought to have been sunk c.1888? Later enclosed and piped for town supply purposes. (as of 1975) Demonstrates Importance of Artesian water to the region. Water tower is a local landmark." N - 638406
Charleville Airport (Charleville Airfield, Qantas Hanger and Norden Bomb Site Store) Mitchell Highway (Qantas Drive) Charleville   (a), (b), (c), (d) "Charleville airport has close historic ties with the birth of commercial aviation in Australia. In 1920, two World War I pilots, Hudson Fysh and Pat McGuinness, registered the Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services Ltd with the objective of establishing an aerial passenger and mail service between the railhead townships of outback Queensland and the Northern Territory. Early in 1922 Qantas successfully tendered for a new government mail contract between Charleville and Cloncurry and over the following months landing grounds were established at points along the route. During this period Qantas contracted the erection of aircraft hangars at the railhead townships of Charleville, Longreach and Cloncurry. Early in 1942, after the Japanese invasion of the Pacific, Charleville airfield became a terminal on the ferry route for heavy bomber aircraft transiting from the United States to the South West Pacific. The remote airfield provided a 28 safe haven for storage of valuable aircraft, the dry climate helping to minimise corrosion. Construction of new runways, dispersal taxiways and four large hangars was completed by July 1942, when control of the airfield was handed to US forces. The historic Qantas hangar survived the war and was later used by Trans-Australia Airlines before being sold and dismantled by the mid-1950s. Today the remains of wartime occupation include a large military aircraft hangar, which was retained by the RAAF when the US forces departed, and a small concrete security shed, built in 1942 as a security store for bombsights fitted to US heavy bombers staging through Charleville. The instruments were removed from the aircraft on landing and taken to this building, where a round-the-clock guard was mounted. Today it provides clear evidence of the determination of the US Air Force to protect the secrecy of its new Norden bombsight." N - 644978
Old Warrego River Bridge Wills Street Charleville   (a), (c) "The earliest crossing of the Warrego River was known as Millar’s Crossing and was located at the river end of Burke Street. Later a bridge was constructed across the river at Wills Street. Some of the early timber piers are still visible beside the present road bridge." N
Memorial to Kingsford Smith's Flight From England On the main bitumen road to Adavale. Charleville   (a), (g) "Further Assessment Required. Erected 1972. Large rock with copper plate affixed giving details of Smith's landing (with engine trouble) and the Wand Plain site near Charleville. On the main bitumen road to Adavale." N - 638372
Old Ward River Bridges   Charleville   (a) "Further Assessment Required. Three old bridges over three sections of the Ward River on the old coach route to Adavale. Reported in 1975 to be of fair condition, adjacent to the present concrete road bridges. 100 yards from the Ward Plain Aero Memorial." N - 638403
RFDS Museum -John Flynn Way   Charleville   (a), (g) "Further Assessment Required."  
Old Warrego River Well   Charleville   (a), (b), (c), (d) "Further Assessment Required. Old well in the Warrego Stream Bed about 7km south of Charleville. Reported in 1975: A shaft lined with wood, and a tree has grown up through the woodwork." N - 638405
Morven
Morven Hospital Warrego Highway Morven Lot 1 A3215 (a), (d), (g) "A cottage maternity hospital was built at Morven in 1925. Prior to this, people requiring medical treatment had to travel to Charleville. Cottage maternity hospitals were small hospitals that provided accommodation for only one or two patients. Other cottage maternity hospitals were built at Millaa Millaa, Mt Mulligan, Barcaldine, Tara and Wallumbilla. The hospital closed for a short time in 1928 owing to a lack of funds and reopened again in 1929 under the control of the Bush Nursing Association. In 1948 the hospital was taken over by the Charleville Hospitals Board. The building was extended in 1964 and the original hospital renovated. This involved the enclosure of the western verandah and the incorporation of the eastern verandah into the new extension. Internally some walls were removed and others repositioned. Description: The Morven Hospital was similar to Millaa Millaa. It is a low set timber building with a hipped roof. The core of the building comprised of two single bed wards, a sterilising room, linen room and matron's living room and bedroom. These rooms were surrounded on three sides by open verandahs and by an enclosed at the rear. A kitchen was located at one corner of the rear verandah and the toilet/bathroom on the other." N - 615267
Town Hall Albert Street (Warrego Highway) Morven   (a), (d), (g) "The Morven Town Hall was officially opened in May 1954, after the town’s previous town hall was destroyed by fire in August 1951 (the time delay was attributed to difficulties in regards to finance, building materials and labour). The hall was funded by the Murweh Shire Council and Mr C. Silvester was the foreman of construction. The hall was opened by Councillor Little (of Murweh Shire Council). It was said to be of a modern design and the Morven community hoped that the new hall would encourage visitors from Charleville to attend their functions. The Charleville Times in 1954 stated that many believed the hall was “the nicest and most spacious west of Toowoomba”. Many town functions and fundraising events have been held in the hall over time." N
Anglican Church Eurella Street Morven Lot 20 SP135742 (a), (d), (g) "The title for this block was aquired by the Church of England in December 1891. A small timber church stands on the lot." N
Catholic Church Eurella Street Morven Lot 11, 12, 13 and 14 CPM23214 (a), (d), (g) "The titles for these blocks were aquired by the Roman Catholic Church in 1941. A small timber church stands on the lot." N
Former Morven Railway Station (now library) Warrego Highway Morven   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. Morven Railway Station is located on the railway between Mitchell and Charleville. In 2015, it has been converted for use as a community library." N - 644598
Morven War Memorial   Morven   (a), (d), (g) "Made of sandstone blocks on a stepped base, the memorial carries large plaques front and back with an Australian Rising Sun badge at the top of each. Roll of Honour for 1914-1919 lists 142 World War I names, many family names being repeated. Of these 13 were killed, 2 died on service and 127 returned. Of these 1 was a Nurse and 4 were awarded the Military Medal. Roll of Honour 1939-1945 lists 102 names. Of these 6 were killed, 3 died on service, and 91 returned. The memorial is set on a concrete base with sandstone supports for a pipe fence." Ref: http://www.qldwarmemorials.com.au/memorial/?id=865 N
Rabbit Board Gate Albert Street Morven   (a), (b) "The Morven Rabbit Board Gate was constructed at the turn of the 20th century and made all the difference to agriculture in the area. Rabbits were on the move, destroying pasture lands and increasing in numbers at an alarming rate. In a desperate bid to halt the rabbit migration Queensland set up 'Rabbit Boards', and the Rabbit Proof Fences came into being. The fences were designed to prevent rabbits digging under and invading more property. The gates were placed on the highways and were the only gap in the fence that stretched for thousands of miles. Travellers would stop at the gate, open it, drive through and then close it. If you forgot to close the gate you could be fined fifty pounds. The history of the Rabbit Board Gates can be found at the site in Morven." N
Tregole Homestead Tregole National Park, Old Charleville Road Morven Lot 239 NPW507 (a) "Further Assessment Required." N - 636043
Winneba House Chesterton Range National Park, Mungallala Redford Road Morven Lot 183 NPW523 (a) "Further Assessment Required." N - 636048
Post Office cnr Warrego Highway and Eurella St Morven Lot 6 RP147612 (a) "Further Assessment Required." N
Rabbit Board Hut Dooloogarah Carnarvon National Park Road Morven Lot 183 NPW523 (a), (b), (d) "Further Assessment Required." N - 636040
Maryvale   Morven   (a) "Further Assessment Required." N - 638370
Other
Angellala Railway Station Warrego Highway; Angellala Creek between Charleville and Morven   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. Angellala (441 miles 74 chains - 550 kms west of Roma Street) was named after the nearby creek. It opened as a station from 2 May 1910, and was also worked as a crossing loop. From 1929 until 1932 the station was worked unattended, however a station mistress was appointed from 1932 date until 1971. Angellala was a watering stop for locomotives, with the water tank situated at the Charleville end of the yard, and the hydrant at the Roma end." N - 644538
Lurnea Railway Station Warrego Highway between Charleville and Morven   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. Lurnea Railway Station is located on the railway between Mitchell and Charleville." N - 644851
Arabella Railway Station Warrego Highway between Charleville and Morven   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. Arabella Railway Station is located on the railway between Mitchell and Charleville." N - 644853
Cooladdi Railway Complex near Diamantina Developmental Road and Quilberry Creek between Charleville and Quilpie   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. An extension to the line was opened in 1898. However, it was designed to intercept cross-border trade with New South Wales so it was south southwest from Charleville to Cunnamulla rather than west. A further development west did not begin until 1911 when a line to Quilpie was commenced as part of the ill-fated Great Western Railway scheme. Cooladdi Railway Complex is located on this line, which opened in 1917." N - 644771
Yalamurra Railway Station near Diamantina Developmental Road and Paroo River between Charleville and Quilpie   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. An extension to the line was opened in 1898. However, it was designed to intercept cross-border trade with New South Wales so it was south southwest from Charleville to Cunnamulla rather than west. A further development west did not begin until 1911 when a line to Quilpie was commenced as part of the ill-fated Great Western Railway scheme. Yalamurra Railway Station is located between the Paroo River and Scotty Creek on this line, which opened in 1917." N - 644856
Wanko Railway Complex near Diamantina Developmental Road and Erac Creek between Charleville and Quilpie   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. An extension to the line was opened in 1898. However, it was designed to intercept cross-border trade with New South Wales so it was south southwest from Charleville to Cunnamulla rather than west. A further development west did not begin until 1911 when a line to Quilpie was commenced as part of the ill-fated Great Western Railway scheme. Wanko Railway Station is located on this line, which opened in 1917." N - 644770
Wallal Railway Station Mitchell Highway between Charleville and Cunnamulla   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. An extension to the line was opened in 1898. However, it was designed to intercept cross-border trade with New South Wales so it was south southwest from Charleville to Cunnamulla rather than west. Wallal Railway Station is located on this line." N - 644852
Murweh Railway Station Mitchell Highway between Charleville and Cunnamulla   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. An extension to the line was opened in 1898. However, it was designed to intercept cross-border trade with New South Wales so it was south southwest from Charleville to Cunnamulla rather than west. Murweh Railway Station is located on this line." N - 644767
Dillalah Railway Station Mitchell Highway between Charleville and Cunnamulla   (a), (d) "In Australia, government fostered the development of railways as a means of developing the country and providing social benefits. It was argued that rail would reduce freight costs and save travel time for passengers. An added incentive for rail development in Queensland was the very poor state of the roads. In wet weather especially, this hampered the transport of freight. Railway development became the province of government because of the doubtful economics of building and operating a rail service for the widely distributed, sparse population of rural Queensland. In most cases the capital costs were high in relation to the potential revenue likely to be raised from passengers and freight. These economies imposed a limit on the expansion of railways into remote areas. The government initially gave priority to developing a railway west of Brisbane. As well as providing graziers and farmers with a more efficient transport link to the coast, railways were seen as a key to encouraging closer settlement west of the Great Dividing Range. The first section of rail, opened on 31 July 1865, was between Ipswich and Bigg's Camp, 34 kilometres west of Ipswich. By February 1868 the rail was extended to Dalby in the Darling Downs. With a railhead provided for the squatters in this region, extensions further west ceased while the railway was developed elsewhere. It was 1876 before construction of the railway westward from Dalby recommenced. The rail was opened to Roma in 1880, Mitchell in 1885 and Charleville on 1 March 1888. With the opening of the rail to the west, the train became an important transport link for passengers and freight. An extension to the line was opened in 1898. However, it was designed to intercept cross-border trade with New South Wales so it was south southwest from Charleville to Cunnamulla rather than west. Dillalah Railway Station is located on this line." N - 644854
Warrego River Bridge - Westgate 572 Miles 72 Chains (921.996km) (Quilpie line - from Roma Street) or 4 Miles 65.75 Chains (7.76km) (Quilpie line - from Westgate) Near Charleville   (a) "A low level timber bridge representative of many of the brides in this part of Queensland which are gradually being replaced with concrete structures and the longest timber trestle rail bridge in Qld. "
" On the 23rd of June 1913 the railway opened for traffic between Westgate and Cooladdi. Description: 63 x 3 x 1 x ?18 foot (5.49 metre) timber longitudinal, concrete plank abutment, timber trestles (nos.1 - 9, 13, 16-19, 23,27,38-42, 45, 47-59, 67-69 unbraced: nos. 10-12, 14-15, 20-22, 24-26, 28-31, 35-37, 46, 64-66 single braced; no's 32-34, 60-63 double braced), concrete plank abutment, cutting Type: timber Form: trestle bridge Tracks: single Alignment: straight track, orthogonal piers, orthogonal crossing Maximum span: 18 feet (5.49 metres) Total length: 1224 feet (373.08 metres) Loading: 12 Condition: serviceable Integrity: "
N - 612513
Formation - Westgate (Quilpie Line) Near Charleville   (a) "The starting point of the Great Western Railway which was designed to link Western Queensland in the way that the North Coast Railway now links the eastern seaboard, but which was never completed for lack of funds."

"On the 21st of December 1910 the Great Western Railway Act to connect Wallal on the South Western Railway to Camooweal in the Gulf Country across Western Queensland assented. On the 23rd of June 1913 the railway opened for traffic between Westgate and Cooladdi and on the 22nd of July 1914 the railway opened for traffic between Cooladdi and Cheepie. On the 11th of April 1917 the railway opened for traffic between Cheepie and Quilpie. Description: Junction of the railway tracks between Charleville and Quilpie and between Charleville and Cunnamulla. Type: formation Form: Tracks: single Alignment: Total length: Condition: serviceable Integrity: "
N - 612641
Mantuan Downs' / 'Babaloora' station boundary fence Carnarvon Gorge National Park, Carnarvon National Park Road Womblebank Lot 236 NPW490 (a) "Further Assessment Required." N - 635213

 

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